Frequently Asked Questions

What do you mean by "common sense gun laws"?

There is plenty of common ground and room for action to improve gun policy. Public polling shows the vast majority of Americans – across party lines – supports laws like expanded background checks (92% in a June 2016 CNN/ORC Poll; 83% in an August 2016 Pew poll). [1]

But we are not asking candidates to support any one particular law. We are asking instead for a deeper commitment. We are asking that legislative candidates pledge to stand with the majority of citizens who want better gun safety laws. We respect the role and responsibility of our lawmakers. The best legislation will reflect the will of the solid majority of constituents.

How strong is public support for changing gun policy?

Polls show that most Americans support:

  • Expanded background checks (92% in a June 2016 CNN/ORC Poll; 83% in an August 2016 Pew poll)
  • Banning those on the terror watch no-fly list (85% in the June 2016 CNN/ORC Poll; 74% in the August 2016 Pew poll)
  • Banning assault-style weapons (54% in the August 2016 Pew poll).
  • Banning high-capacity magazines (54% in the August 2016 Pew poll)

There are other policy changes that receive less public support, but that might also be part of discussions leading to improved public policy.

Would tougher gun laws have prevented the Pulse massacre?

Laws do not STOP crime; they define it, and hopefully deter it. Laws against murder have sadly not stopped all murders, yet no one proposes we strike down laws against murder as therefore pointless.

How else can I honor those affected by the Pulse massacre?

Along with voting for candidates who support the pledge, see the links section of this website for a list of organizations supporting those affected by the Pulse massacre.

How else can I work to reduce gun violence?

A good place to start is the list of direct action groups, organization sponsoring petition drives, and relevant political action committees on our links page.

[1] See for example: